The aim of this workshop is to bring in contact a small number of high-profile research groups working at the interface between mathematical physics and biochemistry, united by the common interest for the role of large chemical networks in the regulation of cellular behavior.

Invited speakers

Confirmed

Prof. John Baez (U. C. Riverside, California; Centre for Quantum Technologies, Singapore) works on information and network theory. He is expert on the mathematical techniques for the study of the topology and dynamics of Chemical Networks. He also coordinates the Azimuth Project, a way for scientists, engineers and mathematicians to do something about the global ecological crisis.

Dr. Arren Bar-Even (Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Potsdam, Systems and Synthetic Metabolism group) and his group study the biochemical logic and design principles of metabolic pathways and their applications in metabolic engineering of microbes, focusing on engineering synthetic alternatives to central metabolic pathways, aiming to uncover optimality in metabolic designs and to offer novel solutions for humanity’s needs in chemical and energy production.

Prof. Pierre Gaspard (Université Libre de Bruxelles), a major expert on the theory of chaotic dynamical systems and of Markov processes for thermodynamic modelling, has recently turned his attention to the role of fluctuations in Chemical Networks and to the stochastic dynamics of copolimerization.

Dr. Luca Peliti has been professor of physics at the University of Naples “Federico II” and member of several prestigious international institutions, working among many other topics on statistical models of evolving populations, the origin of biological order, kinetic proofreading. He is editor of the book Biologically inspired physics.

Prof. Hong Qian (University of Washington) works on the mathematical approach to and physical understanding of biological systems, especially in terms of stochastic mathematics and nonequilibrium statistical physics. In recent years, he has been particularly interested in a nonlinear, stochastic, open system approach to cellular dynamics.

To be confirmed

Dr. Luca Cardelli (Microsoft Research Cambridge)

Prof. Christoff Flamm (Alpen-Adria Universitat)

Prof. Vassily Hatzimanikatis (LCSB, Lausanne)

Dr. Zoran Nikoloski (Max-Planck-Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Potsdam)

Dr. Mark Poolman (Oxford Brookes University)

Prof. Joshua D. Rabinowitz (Princeton)

Prof. Stefan Schuster (Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena)

Dr. David Soloveichik (The University of Texas at Austin)

Prof. Erik Winfree (Caltech)

Local speakers

Prof. Massimiliano Esposito and Dr. Matteo Polettini (University of Luxembourg, Complex Systems and Statistical Mechanics Group) work on the thermodynamics of nonequilibrium processes, and have recently started analyzing the thermodynamics of Chemical Networks and its relation to topology, both at the mean-field and for systems described by the Chemical Master Equation.

Dr. Ronan Fleming (University of Luxemboug, LCSB) leads the Systems Biochemistry Group, an interdiscipinary research group of mathematical, computational and experimental biologists. The fundamental interest is to develop scalable mathematical and numerical analysis techniques that increase the predictive fidelity of biomolecular network models, by incorporating physico-chemical constraints, motivated by optimality principles. Their applied interest is in the aetiopathogenesis and amelioration of Parkinson’s disease.

Dr. Alexander Skupin (University of Luxembourg, Integrative Cell Signalling group) and his group combine state-of-the-art imaging and single cell techniques with mechanistic modelling and bioinformatics analyses to investigate how the emergent behaviour of cells, organs and organisms originates from molecular entities.

Program

A limited number of contributed talks will be welcomed, according to the disposable time schedule. We will communicate this possibility in due time.

A tentative program will be available in March.

The program outline is roughly as follows. There will be 1h 30′ Group slots available to invited PI + junior researcher, plus additional 20′ contributed talks. The final day will be reserved to local researchers from the University of Luxembourg and for a final round table for open discussion. While there will be no dedicated poster session, it will be possible to display posters at the conference premises and there will be time to discuss them during coffee breaks.

Day 1

Methods

Day 2

Information

Day 3

Metabolism

Day 4

Conclusions

8.30 – 10.00

Group slot

Group slot

Group slot

Session c/o locals

10.00 – 10.30

Talk

Talk

Talk

10.30 – 11.00

11.00 – 12.30

Group slot

Group slot

Group slot

Round Table

12.30 – 13.00

Talk

Talk

Talk

13.00 – 14.00

14.00 – 15.30

Group slot

Group slot

Group slot

15.30 – 16.00

Talk

Talk

Talk

16.00 – 16.30

16.30 – 18.00

Group slot

Group slot

Group slot

18.00 – 18.30

Talk

Talk

Talk

19.00 – 22.00

Informal welcome party

Gala dinner

Information

Contact

Please write to matteo.polettini or to massimiliano.esposito followed by at uni.lu, or fill in the form below.